20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000

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  • Churchill and Empire

    £14.99

    Churchill and Empire

    Winston Churchill’s attitude towards the Empire at the time was the stereotypical Victorian paternalistic approach, and he held what many would regard today as racist views, in that he felt that some nationalities were superior to others. This outmoded attitude was one of the reasons the British voters rejected him after the Second World War in which he had led the country brilliantly. His attitude remained decidedly old-fashioned in a world that was shaping up very differently. This ground-breaking volume reveals the many facets of Churchill’s personality: a visionary leader with a truly Victorian attitude toward the British Empire.

    £14.99
  • Fragile Monsters

    £14.99

    Fragile Monsters

    Mary is a difficult grandmother for Durga to love. She is sharp-tongued and ferocious, with more demons than there are lines on her palms. When Durga visits her in rural Malaysia, she only wants to endure Mary, and the dark memories home brings, for as long as it takes to escape. But a reckoning is coming. Stuck together in in the rising heat, both women must untangle the truth from the myth of their family’s past.What happened to Durga’s mother after she gave birth? Why did so many of their family members disappear during the war? And who is to blame for the childhood tragedy that haunts her to this day?

    £14.99
  • House of Glass

    £16.99

    House of Glass

    The Sunday Times bestseller

    ‘An utterly engrossing book’ Nigella Lawson

    ‘Remarkable and gripping’ Edmund de Waal

    ‘A near-perfect study of Jewish identity in the 20th century ? I don’t hesitate to call it a masterpiece’ Telegraph

    SKU: 9780008322632 Category: Tags: ,
    £16.99
  • Letters To Camondo

    £14.99

    Letters To Camondo

    Count Moïse de Camondo lived a few doors away from Edmund de Waal’s forbears, the Ephrussi, first encountered in his bestselling memoir ‘The Hare with Amber Eyes’. Like the Ephrussi, the Camondos were part of Belle Époque high society. They were also targets of ugly anti-semitism. Camondo created a spectacular house and filled it with the greatest private collection of French eighteenth-century art for his son to inherit. But when Nissim was killed in the First World War, it became a memorial and, on the Count’s death, was bequeathed to France. The Musée Nissim de Camondo has remained unchanged since 1936. Edmund de Waal has explored this beautiful palace; the lavish rooms, exquisite objects and detailed archives. In a haunting series of letters, he writes to the Count, and gets to know the boy who journeyed from Constantinople and became a model French citizen, before all that was gained was torn away.

    £14.99
  • Stalin’s War

    £40.00

    Stalin’s War

    Stalin’s only difference from Hitler, McMeekin argues, was that he was a successful murderous predator. With Hitler dead and the Third Reich in ruins, Stalin created an immense new Communist empire. Among his holdings were Czechoslovakia and Poland, the fates of which had first set the West against the Nazis and, of course, China and North Korea, the ramifications of which we still live with today. Until Barbarossa wrought a public relations miracle, turning him into a plucky ally of the West, Stalin had murdered millions, subverted every norm of international behaviour, invaded as many countries as Hitler had, and taken great swathes of territory he would continue to keep. In the larger sense the global conflict grew out of not only German and Japanese aggression but Stalin’s manoeuvrings, orchestrated to provoke wars of attrition between the capitalist powers in Europe and in Asia.

    £40.00
  • The Diaries of Chips Channon. Volume 1

    £35.00

    The Diaries of Chips Channon. Volume 1

    Born in Chicago in 1897, ‘Chips’ Channon settled in England after the Great War, married into the immensely wealthy Guinness family, & served as Conservative MP for Southend-on-Sea from 1935 until his death in 1958. His career was unremarkable. His diaries are quite the opposite. Elegant, gossipy & bitchy by turns, they are the unfettered observations of a man who went everywhere & who knew everybody. Whether describing the antics of London society in the interwar years, or the growing scandal surrounding his close friends Edward VIII & Wallis Simpson during the abdication crisis, or the mood in the House of Commons the day war was declared, his sense of drama & his eye for the telling detail are unmatched. These are diaries that bring a whole epoch vividly to life.

    £35.00