British & Irish history

Showing all 8 results

  • Culloden

    £25.00

    Culloden

    Charles Edward Stuart’s campaign to seize the British throne on behalf of his exiled father ended with one of the quickest defeats in history – his 5000 strong Jacobite army were brutally overpowered at the battle of Culloden in under 40 minutes. However, the affect-effects of Culloden are still felt centuries later. This book guides his reader through the complex heritage of this pivotal moment in British history; from the initial fervour and success that spirited Charles Edward’s Jacobite army into battle, to the ensuing manhunt and wholesale punishment that the British wrought on suspected rebels. O’Keeffe charts the fates of the Jacobite rebels and their leader desperately fleeing British Army patrols across the Highlands.

    £25.00
  • Difficult Women

    £8.99

    Difficult Women

    Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Helen Lewis argues that feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of feminism as a history of difficult women. In this book, you’ll meet the working-class suffragettes who advocated bombings and arson; the princess who discovered why so many women were having bad sex; the pioneer of the refuge movement who became a men’s rights activist; the ‘striker in a sari’ who terrified Margaret Thatcher; the wronged Victorian wife who definitely wasn’t sleeping with the prime minister; and the lesbian politician who outraged the country.

    £8.99
  • Empireland

    £18.99

    Empireland

    In his brilliantly illuminating book, Sathnam Sanghera demonstrates how so much of what we consider to be modern Britain is actually rooted in our imperial past. In prose that is, at once, both clear-eyed and full of acerbic wit, Sanghera shows how our past is everywhere: from how we live to how we think, from the foundation of the NHS to the nature of our racism, from our distrust of intellectuals in public life to the exceptionalism that imbued the campaign for Brexit and the government’s early response to the Covid crisis. And yet empire is a subject, weirdly hidden from view.

    SKU: 9780241445297 Category: Tags: ,
    £18.99
  • Fall

    £18.99

    Fall

    In February 1991, Robert Maxwell made a triumphant entrance into Manhattan harbour on board his yacht, the Lady Ghislaine. He had come to complete his purchase of the ailing New York Daily News. Crowds lined the quayside to watch his arrival. Taxi drivers stopped their cabs to shake his hand, children asked for his autograph and when Maxwell went to dine in the most fashionable Chinese restaurant in Manhattan, all the diners gave him a standing ovation. 10 months later, he disappeared off the same yacht and was found dead in the water. Within a few days, Maxwell was being reviled as the embodiment of greed and unscrupulousness. No one had ever fallen so far and so quickly. What went so wrong? How did a man who had once laid such store on the importance of ethics and good behaviour become reduced to a bloated, amoral wreck? This is a dramatic, gripping account of the rise and fall of Robert Maxwell.

    SKU: 9780241388679 Category: Tags: , ,
    £18.99
  • Jane Austen’s England

    £9.99

    Jane Austen’s England

    It is impossible to fully appreciate Jane Austen without experiencing the landscapes which inspired her. Jane Austen’s England – the first book of its kind – takes the reader on a series of walking tours into the very heart of her world. These fifteen picturesque walks describe the country houses, churches, great estates, and elegant cities that were the settings for her novels and introduce the reader to the real-life people she met, many of whom became characters in her books. This is an indispensable guide for all Austen fans, some of the sights include Godmersham House, the inspiration for Pemberley in Pride and Prejudice, the view from Box Hill, scene of the ‘exploring party’ in Emma, Lyme Regis’ treacherous Cobb in Persuasion, Bath’s Assemmbly Rooms in Northanger Abbey, and many more.

    £9.99
  • The Book in the Cathedral

    £9.99

    The Book in the Cathedral

    The assassination of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral on 29th December, 1170 is one of the most famous events in European history. It inspired the largest pilgrim site in medieval Europe and many works of literature from Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’ to T.S. Eliot’s ‘Murder in the Cathedral’ and Anouilh’s ‘Becket’. In a piece of historical detective work, Christopher de Hamel here identifies the Anglo-Saxon Psalter which Becket cherished throughout his time as Archbishop of Canterbury and which he may even have been holding when he was murdered.

    £9.99
  • The Year 1000

    £9.99

    The Year 1000

    When did globalization begin? Most observers have settled on 1492, the year Columbus discovered America. But as celebrated Yale professor Valerie Hansen shows, it was the year 1000, when for the first time new trade routes linked the entire globe, so an object could in theory circumnavigate the world. This was the ‘big bang’ of globalization, which ushered in a new era of exploration and trade, and which paved the way for Europeans to dominate after Columbus reached America. Drawing on a wide range of new historical sources and cutting-edge archaeology, Hansen shows, for example, that the Maya began to trade with the native peoples of modern New Mexico from traces of theobromine – the chemical signature of chocolate – and that frozen textiles found in Greenland contain hairs from animals that could only have come from North America.

    £9.99
  • Walking the Great North Line

    £20.00

    Walking the Great North Line

    Lay out a map of Britain and something odd becomes apparent: at 1 degree 50 minutes west there is a dead straight line going true north from Stonehenge to Lindisfarne. Two of Britain’s most-ancient and most-revered sites. But there is more. Starting in the south, the line goes dead north from Castle Ditches to old Sarum, through Stonehenge, Knap Hill, and Avebury stone circles, past ancient places in Cricklade, Bibury, Notgrove, and Wootton Wawen. It goes through Long Low, Thor’s Cave, Mam Tor, nearby Twelve Apostles stone circle, Ilkley Roman site, The Badger stone, ancient sites in Lanchester, Eochester, Millstone Burn, Bewick Hill and all the way to finish plum on Lindisfarne Island – one of the most ancient of early Christian sites and still a retreat and monastery. Robert Twigger has travelled this ancient line on foot, like a biologist walking a transect.

    £20.00