Impact of science & technology on society

Showing all 14 results

  • Brave new words

    £25.00

    Brave new words

    Whether we like it or not, the AI revolution is coming to education. In ‘Brave New Words’, Salman Khan, the visionary behind Khan Academy, explores how artificial intelligence and GPT technology will transform learning, offering a roadmap for teachers, parents, and students to navigate this exciting (and sometimes intimidating) new world. An insider in the world of education technology, Khan explains the ins and outs of these cutting-edge tools and how they will forever change the way we learn and teach. Rather than approaching the ChatGPT revolution with white-knuckled fear, Khan wants parents and teachers to embrace AI and adapt to it (while acknowledging its imperfections and limitations), so that every student can complement the work they’re already doing in profoundly new and creative ways, to personalize learning, adapt assessments, and support success in the classroom.

    £25.00
  • Co-intelligence

    £16.99

    Co-intelligence

    Consumer AI arrived with a bang in November 2022 when OpenAI released ChatGPT. Within four months it hit 1 billion users, and media pundits were forecasting the end of jobs and a knowledge revolution. Wharton professor Ethan Mollick immediately understood what ChatGPT really meant: after millions of years on our own, humans had developed a kind of co-intelligence that could augment, or even replace, human thinking. Wide ranging, hugely thought-provoking, optimistic and lucid, ‘Co-Intelligence’ reveals the promise and power of this new era.

    £16.99
  • Fancy bear goes phishing

    £10.99

    Fancy bear goes phishing

    With lucidity and wit, Scott Shapiro establishes that cybercrime has less to do with defective programming than with the faulty wiring of our psyches and society. And because hacking is a human story, he tells the fascinating tales of perpetrators including Robert Morris Jr, the graduate student who accidentally crashed the internet in the 1980s, and the Bulgarian ‘Dark Avenger’ who invented the first mutating computer-virus engine. We also meet a sixteen-year-old from South Boston who took control of Paris Hilton’s cell phone and the Russian intelligence officers who sought to take control of a US election, among others. In telling their stories, he exposes the hackers’ tool kits and gives fresh answers to vital questions – why is the internet so vulnerable, and what can we do in response?

    £10.99
  • How to stand up to a dictator

    £10.99

    How to stand up to a dictator

    What will you sacrifice for the truth? Maria Ressa has spent decades speaking truth to power. But her work tracking disinformation networks seeded by her own government, spreading lies to its own citizens laced with anger and hate, has landed her in trouble with the most powerful man in the country: President Duterte. Now, hounded by the state, she has multiple arrest warrants against her name, and a potential 100+ years behind bars to prepare for – while she stands trial for speaking the truth. ‘How to Stand Up to a Dictator’ is the story of how democracy dies by a thousand cuts, and how an invisible atom bomb has exploded online that is killing our freedoms. It maps a network of disinformation – a heinous web of cause and effect – that has netted the globe.

    £10.99
  • Joined-Up Thinking

    £22.00

    Joined-Up Thinking

    Almost everything we’ve ever achieved has been done by groups of people working together, sometimes across time and space. Like a hive of bees, or a flock of birds, our naturally social, interconnected brains are designed to function best collectively. New technology is helping us share our wisdom and knowledge much more diversely across race, class, gender and borders. And AI is sparking a revolution in our approach to intelligent thinking – linking us into fast-working brainnets for problem solving. Hannah Critchlow brings us an enlightening guide to our future through the evolving new science of collective intelligence. She reveals what it says about us as human beings, shares compelling examples and stories, and shows us how best we can work collectively at work, in families, in any team situation to improve our outcomes, our wellbeing, and our prospects.

    £22.00
  • Ka-boom!

    £10.99

    Ka-boom!

    David Darling travels through space and time to find the largest, smallest, stickiest, loudest, quietest, fastest, slowest, heaviest and brightest?

    £10.99
  • Pencil

    £9.99

    Pencil

    ‘Object Lessons’ is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things. A cylinder of baked graphite and clay in a wood case, the pencil creates as it is being destroyed. To love a pencil is to use it, to sharpen it, and to essentially destroy it. Pencils were used to sketch civilization’s greatest works of art. Pencils were there marking the choices in the earliest democratic elections. Even when used haphazardly to mark out where a saw’s blade should make a cut, a pencil is creating. ‘Pencil’ offers a deep look at this common, almost ubiquitous, object.

    £9.99
  • The atomic human

    £25.00

    The atomic human

    Fears of AI not only concern how it invades our digital lives, but also the implied threat of an intelligence that displaces us from our position at the centre of the world. Neil D. Lawrence’s book shows why these fears may be misplaced. Atomism, proposed by Democritus, suggested it was impossible to continue dividing matter down into ever smaller components: eventually we reach a point where a cut cannot be made (the Greek for uncuttable is ‘atom’). In the same way, by slicing away at the facets of human intelligence that can be replaced by machines, AI uncovers what is left: an indivisible core that is the essence of humanity. By contrasting our own (evolved, locked-in, embodied) intelligence with the capabilities of machine intelligence through history, the book reveals the technical origins, capabilities and limitations of AI systems, and how they should be wielded.

    £25.00
  • The coming wave

    £25.00

    The coming wave

    We are about to cross a critical threshold in the history of our species. Everything is about to change. Soon we will live surrounded by AIs. They will carry out complex tasks – operating businesses, producing unlimited digital content, running core government services and maintaining infrastructure. This will be a world of DNA printers and quantum computers, engineered pathogens and autonomous weapons, robot assistants and abundant energy. It represents nothing less than a step change in human capability. We are not prepared. As cofounder of the pioneering AI company DeepMind, Mustafa Suleyman has been at the centre of this revolution, one poised to become the single greatest accelerant of progress in history. The coming decade, he argues, will be defined by this wave of powerful, fast-proliferating new technologies.

    £25.00
  • The Lazarus Heist

    £12.99

    The Lazarus Heist

    Meet the Lazarus Group, a shadowy cabal of hackers accused of working on behalf of the North Korean state. They form one of the most effective criminal enterprises on the planet, having stolen more than $1bn in an international crime spree. Their targets include central banks, cryptocurrency companies, film studios and even the British National Health Service. Geoff White examines how the North Korean regime has harnessed cutting-edge technology to launch a decade-long campaign of brazen and merciless raids on its richer, more powerful adversaries.

    £12.99
  • The machine age

    £25.00

    The machine age

    A sweeping history of and meditation on humanity’s relationship with machines, showing how we got here and what happens next.

    £25.00
  • The other pandemic

    £20.00

    The other pandemic

    Imagine a deadly pathogen that, once created, could infect any person in any part of the globe within seconds. No need to wait for travellers, trains, or air traffic to spread it, all you need is an internet connection. In this investigation, Pulitzer Prize winner James Ball decodes the cryptic language of the online right and with a surgeon’s precision tracks the spread of QAnon, the world’s first digital pandemic. QAnon began as an internet community dedicated to supporting President Trump and intent on outing a global cabal of human traffickers. A short, cryptic message posted by an anonymous user to a niche internet forum in 2017 was the spark that ignited a global movement. What started as a macabre game of virtual make-believe quickly spiralled into the spread of virulently hateful, dangerous messaging – which turned into tragic, violent actions.

    £20.00
  • The skeptics’ guide to the future

    £10.99

    The skeptics’ guide to the future

    Our predictions of the future are a wild fantasy, inextricably linked to our present hopes and fears, biases and ignorance. Whether they be the outlandish leaps predicted in the 1920s, like multi-purpose utility belts with climate control capabilities and planes the size of luxury cruise ships, or the forecasts of the ’60s, which didn’t anticipate the sexual revolution or women’s liberation, the path to the present is littered with failed predictions and incorrect estimations. The best we can do is try to absorb from futurism’s checkered past, perhaps learning to do a little better. In ‘The Skeptics’ Guide To The Future,’ Steven Novella and his co-authors build upon the work of futurists of the past by examining what they got right, what they got wrong, and how they came to those conclusions.

    £10.99
  • Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow

    £9.99

    Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow

    Two kids meet in a hospital gaming room in 1987. One is visiting her sister, the other is recovering from a car crash. The days and months are long there. Their love of video games becomes a shared world – of joy, escape and fierce competition. But all too soon that time is over, fades from view. When the pair spot each other eight years later in a crowded train station, they are catapulted back to that moment. The spark is immediate, and together they get to work on what they love – making games to delight, challenge and immerse players, finding an intimacy in digital worlds that eludes them in their real lives. Their collaborations make them superstars.

    £9.99