Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography

Showing all 11 results

  • Africa Is Not a Country

    £16.99

    Africa Is Not a Country

    ‘Africa Is Not A Country’ is a kaleidoscopic portrait of modern Africa, that pushes back against harmful stereotypes to tell a more comprehensive story. So often Africa is depicted simplistically as an arid red landscape of famines and safaris, uniquely plagued by poverty and strife. In this funny and insightful book, Dipo Faloyin offers a much-needed corrective, creating a fresh and multifaceted view of this vast continent. To unspool this inaccurate narrative, ‘Africa Is Not A Country’ looks to a wide range of subjects, from chronicling urban life in Lagos and the lively West African rivalry over who makes the best Jollof rice, to the story of democracy in seven dictatorships and the dangers of white saviourism and harmful stereotypes in popular culture. It examines how each African country was formed.

    £16.99
  • Bretons and Britons

    £25.00

    Bretons and Britons

    A long history of the Bretons, from prehistoric times to the present, and the very close relationship they have had with their British neighbours. It is a story of a fiercely independent people and their struggle to maintain their distinctive identity.

    £25.00
  • How Religion Evolved and Why It Endures

    £22.00

    How Religion Evolved and Why It Endures

    When did humans develop spiritual thought? What is religion’s evolutionary purpose? And in our increasingly secular world, why has it endured? Every society in the history of humanity has lived with religion. In this book, evolutionary psychologist Professor Robin Dunbar tracks its origins back to what he terms the ‘mystical stance’ – the aspect of human psychology that predisposes us to believe in a transcendent world, and which makes an encounter with the spiritual possible. As he explores world religions and their many derivatives, as well as religions of experience practised by hunter-gatherer societies since time immemorial, Dunbar argues that this instinct is not a peculiar human quirk, an aberration on our otherwise efficient evolutionary journey.

    £22.00
  • Me and White Supremacy

    £9.99

    Me and White Supremacy

    Between June and July 2018, Layla Saad ran a 28-day Instagram challenge under the hashtag `MeAndWhiteSupremacy, for people with white privilege to unflinchingly examine the ways that they are complicit in upholding the oppressive system of white supremacy. The challenge quickly went viral, with thousands of people from all over the world diving deep for 28 consecutive days to examine and take responsibility for the ways in which they uphold white supremacy. The challenge catalysed a worldwide awakening for thousands of white-privileged people to begin to take ownership of their personal anti-racism work. This updated and expanded book takes the work deeper by adding more historical and cultural contexts, sharing moving stories and anecdotes, and including expanded definitions, examples, and and further resources.

    £9.99
  • Memento Mori

    £25.00

    Memento Mori

    ‘Memento Mori’ takes the reader on a ghoulish but beautiful tour of some of the world’s more unusual sacred sites and traditions, in which human remains are displayed for the benefit of the living. From burial caves in Indonesia festooned with bones, to skulls smoking cigarettes, wearing beanie hats and sunglasses, and decorated with garlands of flowers in South America, Paul Koudounaris ventures beyond the grave to find messages of hope and salvation.

    SKU: 9780500252611 Category: Tag:
    £25.00
  • Orderly Britain

    £16.99

    Orderly Britain

    All societies, in their own ways, are orderly. The very term ‘society’ implies the existence of a degree of organisation and predictability to human life. Orderliness, however, is a matter of degree. It is neither total, nor totally absent. In recent times, however, such concerns have largely given way to a greater preoccupation with disorderliness: with significant and disruptive social change; with rising crime and anti-social behaviour; and with a variety of other social problems. But what has really been happening? How should we think about the nation’s changing social order over the last 70 years? Here, Newburn and Ward focus on such commonplace, prosaic and mundane matters as dog-fouling, swearing, drinking, smoking, nudity, public toilets and parking. These everyday matters, they argue, have much to tell us about social change and, more particularly, about the changing nature of British society.

    £16.99
  • Secrets of the Sprakkar

    £18.99

    Secrets of the Sprakkar

    Iceland is the best place on earth to be a woman – but why? For the past twelve years, the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report has ranked Iceland number one on its list of countries closing the gap in equality between men and women. What is it about Iceland that makes many women’s experience there so positive? Eliza Reid, the First Lady of Iceland, examines her adopted homeland’s attitude toward women – the deep-seated cultural sense of fairness, the influence of current and historical role models, and, crucially, the areas where Iceland still has room for improvement.

    £18.99
  • Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat [Second Edition]

    £12.99

    Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat [Second Edition]

    Does living with a pet really make people happier and healthier? What can we learn from biomedical research with mice? Drawing on over two decades of research in the emerging field of anthrozoology, the science of human-animal relations, Hal Herzog offers surprising answers to these and other questions.

    £12.99
  • The Dawn of Everything

    £12.99

    The Dawn of Everything

    For generations, our remote ancestors have been cast as primitive and childlike – either free and equal innocents, or thuggish and warlike. Civilisation, we are told, could be achieved only by sacrificing those original freedoms or, alternatively, by taming our baser instincts. David Graeber and David Wengrow show how such theories first emerged in the eighteenth century as a conservative reaction to powerful critiques of European society posed by indigenous observers and intellectuals. Revisiting this encounter has startling implications for how we make sense of human history today, including the origins of farming, property, cities, democracy, slavery and civilisation itself. Drawing on path-breaking research in archaeology and anthropology, the authors show how history becomes a far more interesting place once we learn to throw off our shackles and perceive what’s really there.

    £12.99
  • The Species That Changed Itself

    £12.99

    The Species That Changed Itself

    Other species adapt to their environments; we alone create ours. Over generations, we have remade the world to suit ourselves – using improved knowledge and technology to confront the traditional scourges – and for the most part we enjoy prosperity beyond the dreams of our ancestors. What’s more, in changing our world, we have also reshaped the human phenotype – the interaction between genes and environment that moulds our bodies and minds. Our experiences of life have been transformed, and in turn so have our societies. Weaving together biology, social anthropology, epidemiology and history, Edwin Gale examines the shifting physical and mental dimensions of our lives, from ageing to illness, food production to reproduction, designer bodies to IQ tests, and asks: are we a self-domesticated species?

    £12.99
  • Wisdom of the Ancients

    £9.99

    Wisdom of the Ancients

    In all of recorded history this is the best time to be alive. We have increased life expectancy, better living conditions, the boundless potential of technology. Yet for all we have gained in the modern world, simple peace of mind is hard to find. In a time that is increasingly fraught with complexity and conflict, we are told that our wellbeing relies on remaining as present as possible. But what if the key to being present lies in the past? Neil Oliver takes us back in time, to grab hold of the ideas buried in forgotten cultures and early civilisations. From Laetoli footprints in Tanzania to Keralan rituals, stone circles and cave paintings, Oliver takes us on a global journey through antiquity.

    £9.99