Social, group or collective psychology

Showing all 9 results

  • Explaining Humans

    £9.99

    Explaining Humans

    Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at the age of eight, Camilla Pang struggled to understand the world around her and the way people worked. Desperate for a solution, Camilla asked her mother if there was an instruction manual for humans that she could consult. But, without the blueprint to life she was hoping for, Camilla began to create her own. Now armed with a PhD in biochemistry, Camilla dismantles our obscure social customs and identifies what it really means to be human using her unique expertise and a language she knows best: science. Through a set of scientific principles, this book examines life’s everyday interactions including: decisions and the route we take to make them; conflict and how we can avoid it; relationships and how we establish them; etiquette and how we conform to it.

    £9.99
  • Four Thousand Weeks

    £16.99

    Four Thousand Weeks

    The average human lifespan is absurdly, outrageously, insultingly brief: if you live to 80, you have about four thousand weeks on earth. How should we use them best? Of course, nobody needs telling that there isn’t enough time. We’re obsessed by our lengthening to-do lists, our overfilled inboxes, the struggle against distraction, and the sense that our attention spans are shrivelling. Yet we rarely make the conscious connection that these problems only trouble us in the first place thanks to the ultimate time-management problem: the challenge of how best to use our four thousand weeks. ‘Four Thousand Weeks’ is an uplifting, engrossing and deeply realistic exploration of this problem.

    £16.99
  • Social Psychology

    £46.99

    Social Psychology

    The eighth edition of this lively introduction places social psychology in a contemporary, real-world context and explores new, cutting-edge research as well as bringing classic theories to life. Thoroughly revised to enhance accessibility, and updated to include over 250 new references, this trusted, market-leading, cutting edged textbook remains as comprehensive as ever. 

    SKU: 9781292090450 Category: Tag:
    £46.99
  • Sway

    £10.99

    Sway

    Have you ever been told to smile more, been teased about your accent, or had your name pronounced incorrectly? If so, you’ve probably already faced bias in your everyday life. We like to believe that we are all fair-minded and egalitarian but we all carry biases that we might not even be aware of. We might believe that we live in a post-racial society, but racial tension and inequality is pernicious and pervasive. We might believe that gender inequality is a thing of the past, but it is still ubiquitous. Unconscious bias has become a frequently-used term in our vocabulary, but there are still so many myths around it. For the first time, behavioural scientist, activist and writer Dr Pragya Agarwal unravels the way our implicit or ‘unintentional’ biases affect the way we communicate and perceive the world, and how they affect our decision-making, even in life and death situations.

    £10.99
  • The Dawn of Language

    £25.00

    The Dawn of Language

    Who was ‘the first speaker’ and what was their first message? Drawing on evidence from many fields, including archaeology, anthropology, neurology and linguistics, Sverker Johansson weaves these disparate threads together to show how our human ancestors evolved into language users. ‘The Dawn of Language’ provides a fascinating survey of how grammar came into being and the differences or similarities between languages spoken around the world, before exploring how language eventually emerged in the very remote human past.

    £25.00
  • The Psychology of Stupidity

    £9.99

    The Psychology of Stupidity

    Some of the world’s smartest people explain stupidity, among them: Daniel Kahneman, Dan Ariely, Alison Gopnik, Howard Gardner, Antonio Damasio, Aaron James and Ryan Holiday

    £9.99
  • The War of Nerves

    £25.00

    The War of Nerves

    More than any other conflict, the Cold War was fought on the battlefield of the human mind. And, nearly 30 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union, its legacy still endures – not only in our politics, but in our own thoughts, and fears. Drawing on a vast array of untapped archives and unseen sources, Martin Sixsmith vividly recreates the tensions and paranoia of the Cold War, framing it for the first time from a psychological perspective. Revisiting towering personalities like Khrushchev, Kennedy and Nixon, as well as the lives of the unknown millions who were caught up in the conflict, this is a gripping account of fear itself – and in today’s uncertain times, it is more resonant than ever.

    £25.00
  • The Weirdest People in the World

    £14.99

    The Weirdest People in the World

    Do you identify yourself by your profession, rather than your family? Do you consider yourself unique? Do you have personal goals? If so, perhaps you are WEIRD: raised in a society that is Western, Educated, Industrialised, Rich and Democratic. Unlike most who have ever lived, WEIRD people are highly individualistic, self-involved, control-oriented, nonconformist and analytical. They focus on themselves – their attributes, accomplishments and aspirations – over their social roles. How did WEIRD populations become so psychologically peculiar? What part did these differences play in the industrial revolution and the expansion of European power? And what do they mean for our sense of who we are now? Henrich, who coined the influential concept of WEIRD, explores the historical evolution of family structures, marriage and religion, and draws on research to analyse how these institutions have shaped the mind.

    £14.99
  • Think Again

    £20.00

    Think Again

    Intelligence is usually seen as the ability to think and learn, but in a rapidly changing world, there’s another set of cognitive skills that might matter more: the ability to rethink and unlearn. In recent months, the pandemic has forced us all to reevaluate our assumptions about health and safety and multiple acts of police brutality have challenged most of us to reconsider our responsibility for fighting racism. Yet in our daily lives, too many of us still favor the comfort of conviction over the discomfort of doubt. We listen to opinions that make us feel good, instead of ideas that make us think hard. ‘Think Again’ reveals that we don’t have to believe everything we think or internalize everything we feel. It’s an invitation to let go of views that are no longer serving us well and prize mental flexibility, humility, and curiosity over foolish consistency.

    £20.00